Deborah Keene

Associate Director, Foundations Coordinator

147 Blount Living-Learning Center | (205) 348-3334 | dakeene@ua.edu

Deborah Keene is an archaeological scientist who specializes in Southeastern U.S. prehistory. She started excavating with the Schiele Museum when she was 15 and went on to work for various private archaeological firms while an undergraduate and then graduate student. She worked as a principal investigator at the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology after earning her Ph.D. She specialized in ceramic analysis, shallow geophysics, households, and subsistence strategies. After moving to Alabama, her focus changed from fieldwork to education. She uses her anthropological and scientific backgrounds to teach liberal arts courses for the Blount Scholars Program.

Kendra Abbott

Senior Fellow

Mary Harmon Bryant Hall 357 | (254) 653-7300 | kabbott3@ua.edu

Kendra is a professional nature photographer, educator and outdoor enthusiast. She is an ecologist and has focused on endangered species and conservation issues much of her career.

Seth Bordner

Senior Fellow

333 Ten Hoor Hall | (205) 348-5942 | seth.bordner@ua.edu

Website

Seth Bordner joined the University in 2011 after finishing his doctorate at UNC Chapel Hill. Originally from central Pennsylvania, he is a first-generation college student who never took the sensible advice to get a real job. He teached the History of Philosophy sequence (PHL 211 & 212) in the philosophy department, along with regular sections of Intro to Ethics and Philosophy of Sport. His research is an eclectic mix of history of philosophy and contemporary applied issues in science and sports. Fall 2017 is his first semester teaching in Blount.

Jennifer Caputo

Senior Fellow

1210 University Hall | (205) 348-1656 | jlcaputo@ccs.ua.edu

Website

Jennifer Caputo began teaching at UA in 2008 as an instructor in New College and currently teaches a range of on-campus and distance arts and humanities courses. She is originally from New York and holds degrees in percussion performance/music education and ethnomusicology. She was introduced to the music and culture of Ghana in 1998 while taking a weekly class that met regularly in Riverside Park in NYC. She has been studying and performing Ghanaian and West African music ever since. Fun fact: while attending the Ghanaian music class in 1999 in Riverside Park, the Dalai Lama (who was scheduled to appear in Central Park in August) walked by with his entourage and stopped to listen to our rehearsal.

Toni Copeland

Senior Fellow

201 Oliver-Barnard Hall | (205) 348-1706 | toni.copeland@ua.edu

“But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world, and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.” (E.B. White 1969).

Toni Copeland is a biocultural medical anthropologist interested in how biological, cultural, and social factors interact to influence health and illness. Her research as primarily been in Kenya and the American Deep South.

Andrew Dewar

Senior Fellow

221 Lloyd Hall | (205) 348-9928 | adewar@ua.edu

Website

Andrew Raffo Dewar is a composer, musician, ethnomusicologist, and arts organizer.

As a composer and performer of experimental acoustic and electronic music, his work has been presented throughout North America, Europe, and Southeast Asia, and he appears on nearly two dozen commercially released recordings.

As a scholar, Dr. Dewar’s research interests include experimentalism in the arts, jazz and improvisation, music technologies, intercultural music, and 1960s intermedia arts. His writing has been published in the Journal of the Society for American Music, Leonardo Music Journal, Jazz Perspectives, the New Grove Dictionary of American Music (2nd Edition), Musicians and Composers of the 20th Century, and the Jazz Research Journal. He also has chapters published in Negotiated Moments: Improvisation, Representation and Subjectivity, edited by Gillian Siddall & Ellen Waterman (Duke University Press, 2016), and Experimental Music in Practice: Perspectives from Latin America, edited by Alejandro Madrid, Ana Minutti, Eduardo Herrera (Oxford University Press, 2017).

Dr. Dewar is an Associate Professor in New College and the School of Music.

Matt Feminella

Senior Fellow

263-B BB Comer Hall | (205) 348-9067 | mfeminella@ua.edu

Matt Feminella is an Assistant Professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics and the Fulbright Program Advisor for UA. He received his PhD from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 2016. When he isn’t teaching undergraduate and graduate German courses, Dr. Feminella spends his time researching eighteenth-century intellectual history and theater cultures.

Jolene Hubbs

Senior Fellow

ten Hoor Hall 106C | (205) 348-5940 | jhubbs@ua.edu

Alan Lazer

Senior Fellow

201 Oliver-Barnard Hall | (205) 348-1706 | adlazer@ua.edu

Hank Lazer

Senior Fellow

138 Blount Living-Learning Center | (205) 348-8324 | hlazer@ua.edu

Website

Hank Lazer has published twenty-five books of poetry, including Poems Hidden in Plain View (2016, in English and in French), Brush Mind: At Hand (2016), and The New Spirit (2005). He has two new books of poetry forthcoming in the fall of 2017: Thinking in Jewish (N20) and Evidence of Being Here: Beginning in Havana (N27). In January 2014, Lazer retired from the University of Alabama after 37 years in a variety of positions, including Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, Executive Director of Creative Campus, and Professor of English. Lazer’s Blount / New College seminar is “Zen Buddhism and Radical Approaches to the Arts,” where students practice meditation and learn about some radical art forms. Lazer convenes a weekly meditation session (open to all) on Monday evenings, 5:15-6:00pm, at the Ferguson Center. He can be reached at hlazer@bama.ua.edu .

Yolanda Manora

Senior Fellow

Morgan Hall 213 | (205) 348-9270 | ymanora@ua.edu

Marni Presnall

Senior Fellow

Rowand-Johnson Hall 10 | (205) 348-7959 | mpresnall@ua.edu

Richard Richards

Senior Fellow

335 ten Hoor Hall | (205) 348-5942 | rrichard@ua.edu

Website

Richard Richards, professor and chair of the philosophy department, has been involved with the Blount Scholars program since its first year. His research is in the philosophy of science and philosophy of biology, and he has two books published by Cambridge University Press, The Species Problem: A Philosophical Analysis, and Biological Taxonomy: A Philosophical Introduction.  He is finishing a third book with Cambridge, The Biology of Art.  

Stephen Schwab

Senior Fellow

352 ten Hoor Hall | (205) 348-1238 | schwa008@ua.edu

Website

Dr. Stephen Schwab, former (and retired) official at the Central Intelligence Agency, is now an adjunct assistant professor of history at The University of Alabama. Since 2009, he has been doing his best to inspire or, if necessary, “spook” young Blount Scholars into doing their best to succeed as undergraduates and later in life.  

Stephen Tedeschi

Senior Fellow

224 Morgan Hall | (205) 348-5065 | satedeschi@ua.edu

Website

Steve Tedeschi is an English professor at UA.

Claire Thompson

Senior Fellow

ten Hoor Hall | (205) 454-4954 | cethompson1@bama.ua.edu

Dr. Claire Thompson is an anthropologist who specializes in Southeastern archaeology. She enjoys bringing a cultural perspective to the Blount Foundations courses that she teaches.

Deborah Weiss

Senior Fellow

Morgan Hall 227 | (205) 348-7950 | dweiss@ua.edu

Andrew Deaton

Junior Fellow

akdeaton@crimson.ua.edu

I am a doctoral student in the Department of History who researches the premodern military history of central Europe.  I also have a background in philosophy and a love for languages.

Kohl Dothage

Junior Fellow

kdothage@crimson.ua.edu

I’m a PhD student in the Anthropology department focusing on biocultural medical anthropology and an MPH student in the department of Health Sciences. My dissertation explores the ways in which mothers and children living in rural Central America navigate political, social, and economic marginalization, examines the differential health impacts of this marginalization, and seeks to further our understanding of the types of material and abstract resources that foster resiliency in the face of adversity.

Camille Morgan

Junior Fellow

ccmorgan2@crimson.ua.edu

Camille Morgan is a PhD student in the Anthropology department. Primarily trained as a bioarchaeologist, her dissertation focuses on the different ways in which human remains are displayed in North American contexts, from prehistoric to modern times, what these displays can tell us about the power dynamics between the groups involved, and how these messages are shaped by histories of aggression.

Courtney Parker

Junior Fellow

caparker4@crimson.ua.edu

Courtney Parker is a PhD candidate in the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies. Her dissertation examines how gender and occult power are represented in English drama, poetry, and street literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Her other research interests include Milton, women writers, Shakespeare’s contemporaries, and medievalism in the nineteenth-century American South.